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Howto end the vicious cycle of pets over population

動物的樂園不應該使用低效的階梯,動物邁進樂園應該要用高速的電梯

Howto end the vicious cycle of pets over population

Postby admin » Tue Jul 19, 2016 1:06 am

First, we are not talking about animal over population, it is a much bigger topic out of scope. In my opinion, the problem can only be resolved from top to down at the same time, meaning both supply and demand need to be throttled, and for the existing pets population, all the cost should be lowered especially the medical charge, because the biggest reason people abandon their pets is because the medical expense is much higher than the cost of buying a pet itself, they tend to buy new pets instead which in turn increase the demand and the existing population. Everybody knows the worst case scenario is to abandon their pets in the nature, when the pets are out in the nature, they probably start to over populate to expand their territory, which probably will destroy the balance of the food chain. When the pets are out in the street, they will soon or later end up in the shelters, the shelters which suppose they are really non profit, most definitely cannot afford the huge bill of medical charge, they will start to euthanize the pets when they reach their capacity or running out of cash, and more pet owners will tend to abandon their pets in the nature other than in the street to avoid euthanization. The huge medical bill also cost the better health of the shelter pets, and people will be more cautious to adopt pets from shelter, because again, the medical expense is much higher than the cost of buying a pet itself.

Concerning the supply, people should be encouraged to adopt from professional (most likely big) shelters that have capability to maintain good health of their pets, those unprofessional (most likely small) shelters should consider to merge or build alliance with big shelters to maintain the good health of pets, I hope nobody is trying to make a profit here in those non profit shelters if they really trying to do good deeds. People should be encouraged to buy from trusted pet breeder instead of pets mill or unprofessional breeders, there should be a better controlled system in place for breeder certification. And shelters should make the adoption process easier, other than that, people will try to buy pets instead of adoption because the happiness of having a pet is much valuable than the cost of a pet, again, this will cost the increase of pet population. Besides, it is better for them to be taken special care by individual person, other than in a crowded shelter.

Concerning the demand, people should be encouraged to do their homework before adopt or buying pets, they not only should know how to choose a right breed to suit their needs, but they should also know all the worst scenario about how pets could affect their life if possible. Take a woman I know for example, in my understanding she must be a good pet owner, but it turn out that she don't know how troublesome to raise a pet until then. And people should their self evaluation to see if they are suitable to raise pets, take myself as an example, I bring home a stray cat, she is wild and always use my hands as scratch pads, but I treated her well like a friend because scratch things with their nails is a most natural cat thing to do, so she always trusted me and one night she gave birth next to me on my bed, and it is such a beautiful thing to remember.

That is just my 2 cents, hope it will do something good.
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Re: Howto end the vicious cycle of pets over population

Postby admin » Wed Feb 01, 2017 8:03 pm

http://www.aspca.org/animal-homelessnes ... statistics
Facts about U.S. Animal Shelters:

There are about 13,600 community animal shelters nationwide that are independent; there is no national organization monitoring these shelters. The terms “humane society” and “SPCA” are generic; shelters using those names are not part of the ASPCA or the Humane Society of the United States. Currently, no government institution or animal organization is responsible for tabulating national statistics for the animal protection movement. These are national estimates; the figures may vary from state to state.

Approximately 7.6 million companion animals enter animal shelters nationwide every year. Of those, approximately 3.9 million are dogs and 3.4 million are cats.
Each year, approximately 2.7 million animals are euthanized (1.2 million dogs and 1.4 million cats).
Approximately 2.7 million shelter animals are adopted each year (1.4 million dogs and 1.3 million cats).
About 649,000 animals who enter shelters as strays are returned to their owners. Of those, 542,000 are dogs and only 100,000 are cats.
Of the dogs entering shelters, approximately 35% are adopted, 31% are euthanized and 26% of dogs who came in as strays are returned to their owner.
Of the cats entering shelters, approximately 37% are adopted, 41% are euthanized, and less than 5% of cats who came in as strays are returned to their owners.
About twice as many animals enter shelters as strays compared to the number that are relinquished by their owners.


Facts about Pet Ownership in the U.S.:

It's estimated that 70-80 million dogs and 74-96 million cats are owned in the United States. Approximately 37-47% of all households in the United States have a dog, and 30-37% have a cat. (Source: APPA)
According to the American Veterinary Medical Association, approximately 40% of pet owners learned about their pet through word of mouth.
The majority of pets are obtained from acquaintances and family members. 28% of dogs are purchased from breeders, and 29% of cats and dogs are adopted from shelters and rescues.
More than 35% of cats are acquired as strays. (Source: APPA)
According to the American Humane Association, the most common reasons why people relinquish or give away their dogs is because their place of residence does not allow pets (29%), not enough time, divorce/death and behavior issues (10% each). The most common reasons for cats are that they were not allowed in the residence (21%) and allergies (11%).


Facts about Pet Overpopulation in the U.S.:

It is impossible to determine how many stray dogs and cats live in the United States; estimates for cats alone range up to 70 million.
The average number of litters a fertile cat produces is one to two a year; the average number of kittens is four to six per litter.
The average number of litters a fertile dog produces is one a year; the average number of puppies is four to six.
Owned cats and dogs generally live longer, healthier lives than strays.
Many strays are lost pets who were not kept properly indoors or provided with identification.
Only 10%of the animals received by shelters have been spayed or neutered, while 83% of pet dogs and 91% of pet cats are spayed or neutered.
The cost of spaying or neutering a pet is less than the cost of raising puppies or kittens for a year.
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Re: Howto end the vicious cycle of pets over population

Postby admin » Mon Feb 13, 2017 4:56 pm

http://share.renren.com/share/253139570/9664427560
因数量过剩每年20万只猫狗在日本遭屠杀,日本的宠物店,每年都有2000亿的生意,但日本人购买宠物就像购买手袋一样,一旦不要了,猫猫狗狗们就被系上红带,关入二氧化碳毒气室,在痛苦挣扎
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Re: Howto end the vicious cycle of pets over population

Postby admin » Wed Apr 12, 2017 1:34 pm

The Vacuum Effect: Why Catch and Kill Doesn’t Work
https://www.alleycat.org/resources/the- ... esnt-work/
Removing cats from an area by killing or relocating them is not only cruel—it’s pointless. Animal control agencies and city governments have blindly perpetuated this futile approach for decades. But scientific research, years of failed attempts, and evidence from animal control personnel prove that catch and kill doesn’t permanently clear an area of cats.

Scientific evidence indicates that removing feral cat populations only opens up the habitat to an influx of new cats, either from neighboring territories or born from survivors. Each time cats are removed, the population will rebound through a natural phenomenon known as the “vacuum effect,” drawing the community into a costly, endless cycle of trapping and killing.

The vacuum effect is a phenomenon scientifically recognized worldwide, across all types of animal species

Well-documented among biologists, the vacuum effect describes what happens when even a portion of an animal population is permanently removed from its home range. Sooner or later, the empty habitat attracts other members of the species from neighboring areas, who move in to take advantage of the same resources that attracted the first group (like shelter and food). Killing or removing the original population does nothing to eliminate these resources; it only creates a “vacuum” that will inevitably draw in other animals living nearby.

Scientific research has observed the vacuum effect across many species—herbivores, carnivores, and omnivores. When studying mountain lions, for example, one researcher noted, “When you remove resident lions that have established home ranges you create a void.” He continues, “Other resident lions that have home ranges that may overlap the individual you removed now find that territory empty. This allows them to expand their range, as well as create openings for transient lions to establish a new home range.”1

Simply put, when mountain lions are removed from their habitat, other mountain lions move in. This behavior has also been documented in possums,2 badgers,3 and raccoons.4

A habitat will support a population of a certain size. No matter how many animals are removed, if the resources remain, the population will eventually recover. Any cats remaining after a catch and kill effort will produce more kittens and at a higher survival rate, filling the habitat to capacity. As one study found, “populations greatly reduced by culling are likely to rebound quickly.”5 Over time, the number of cats in an area where a feral cat colony has been killed or relocated will simply recover and return to its original size.

Removing cats from an area is a futile effort—one that cannot succeed

The only documented “successful” effort to remove a population of cats occurred in a cruel program on uninhabited, sub-Antarctic Marion Island. It took two decades and ruthless methods—methods that are impossible to replicate in areas inhabited by people including poisoning, hunting with guns, and introducing disease—to clear the island of cats. As scientists tried each method, they noted “the recolonization of preferred habitats, cleared of cats, from neighboring suboptimal areas…”6 In other words, like the mountain lions, whenever they killed cats in the best habitats, the cats next door simply moved in.

The Marion Island example proves the vacuum effect while it also proves the impossibility of permanently clearing an area of an entire target population. Municipalities engaged in any type of catch and kill efforts are fighting a cruel, endless, losing battle against nature that is a gross waste of taxpayer dollars and ends hundreds of lives.

Years of failed catch and kill policies prove this method’s ineffectiveness

Animal control officers all over the country have observed the ineffectiveness of lethal methods firsthand through years of misguided policy.

Joan Brown, President and CEO of the Humane League of Lancaster County (PA), says that her organization made the switch to Trap-Neuter-Return when they started to realize that they were never making any headway with catch and kill.

Catch and Kill“I finally went to the board and said, ‘Where in our mission statement does it say euthanize? Because all we’re doing is taking [feral cats] in to euthanize them…we’re not only doing an inhumane thing, we’re actually contributing to the problem, creating a vacuum effect that will just be filled again—and probably at a faster rate than when we started,’” says Brown.

Brown says that they noticed it was a never-ending and growing problem, draining their resources and their morale: “At the very least, we were standing still. That was clear, and it seemed as if we were running forward, but actually moving backward.”

Trap-Neuter-ReturnOther animal control and shelter organizations nationwide have also taken a stand after acknowledging the failed results of their catch and kill efforts. Maricopa County, Arizona’s animal control website says, “We have over 20 years of documented proof that traditional ways of dealing with feral cats don’t work. The catch and kill method of population control (trap a cat, bring it to a shelter, ask that the cat be euthanized), has not reduced the number of feral cats. The cat may be gone, but now there is room for another cat to move in…So, catch and kill actually makes the problem worse.”7 And the Humane Society of Ochocos (Oregon) agrees: “…[W]e know now, that more than 30 years of trapping and killing cats has done nothing to reduce the feral cat population.”8

The National Animal Control Association amended its feral cat policy in 2008 to be more supportive of Trap-Neuter-Return, in part because, as then president Mark Kumpf put it, “[i]t’s recognizing that in some cases, certain jurisdictions and communities are more interested in maintaining a stable cat population than they are in simply bailing the ocean with a thimble.”

He continues: “What we’re saying is the old standard isn’t good enough anymore. As we’ve seen before, there’s no department that I’m aware of that has enough money in their budget to simply practice the old capture and euthanize policy; nature just keeps having more kittens.” 9

If catch and kill had any long-term effect on cat populations, animal control officers nationwide—and their leadership organizations—would have observed it by now. Instead, they are reading the writing on the wall and switching to the method that works.

Trap-Neuter-Return is the responsible, humane method of care for feral cats

Trap-Neuter-Return stabilizes feral cat populations. The cats are humanely trapped, vaccinated, and neutered, so no more kittens will be born. They are then returned to their original location to live out their lives in their outdoor home. Not only is Trap-Neuter-Return the humane option for feral cats, it also improves cats’ lives by relieving them of the stresses of mating and pregnancy. In the end, unlike catch and kill, TNR works.

It’s time to stop the killing.

Cities and shelters across America have experienced great success with Trap-Neuter-Return—it is now official policy for feral cats in Washington, DC, Baltimore, and Chicago. It’s time to learn from past mistakes and move forward instead of going around in circles—it’s time to stop fighting the endless battle of catch and kill and protect cats’ lives.
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Re: Howto end the vicious cycle of pets over population

Postby admin » Wed Apr 12, 2017 1:49 pm

Anti-Cruelty Laws
https://www.alleycat.org/resources/anti ... -all-cats/
In November 2007, a deadlocked jury led to a mistrial in the case of the Galveston birder charged with felony cruelty for intentionally shooting and killing a cat with a .22-caliber rifle. The man’s lawyer reported that his client went to the San Luis Pass Bridge with “an intent to kill” and admits to shooting the cat, but that he claims he did so to protect piping plovers, an endangered species of bird that winters in Galveston. The national media reported that the case hinged on proving the cat was “owned” by John Newland, a man who had put out food, blankets, and toys for this and other cats living under the bridge.

Let’s set the record straight: Intentionally killing a cat is a criminal offense in all 50 states and the District of Columbia, regardless of ownership. Anti-cruelty laws apply to all cats—companion, abandoned, lost, and feral—and there is no such thing as a “piping plover defense.”

Anti-cruelty laws are among many types of laws designed to protect society from violent people. In fact, anti-cruelty laws, first enacted in the late 1800s, were established to protect animals from human violence, irrespective of ownership. These laws led to the creation of child abuse laws and then, in the 20th century, elder abuse laws. The common denominator in all of these laws is protection from a violent person. Scientific research now provides a nuanced understanding of the link between different types of violence. An aggressive individual who lashes out in response to conflict is a threat to society, whether the victim is a child, a spouse, or an animal. Intentionally shooting a cat is a violent act. That fact doesn’t change because the animal isn’t wearing a collar.

Like the laws against homicide, anti-cruelty laws excuse intentional killing in the rare cases when harm is imminent and serious, making lethal force necessary. Although anti-cruelty laws include other defenses, they do not recognize a bird-protection defense. Indeed, the piping plovers at issue in the Galveston case are already protected by federal laws, as are hundreds of other bird species.

Those laws reflect decisions made by elected officials, informed by scientific evidence, on the best measures to protect and recover endangered species. In fact, scientific research shows that humans, not cats, are the overwhelming cause of declining bird populations. No individual is entitled to act contrary to the law simply because that person’s opinion differs from the collective judgment of the legislature.

Anti-cruelty laws protect all cats. That protection is not—and as a practical matter, cannot be—based on ownership status. We wouldn’t want such distinctions to be made anyway, because like many criminal laws, these laws exist to protect all of us from aggressive individuals. We are a nation of laws, not of violence. For this to hold true, we must remain vigilant against every act of violence, inflicted on any victim—even when the victim is a cat.
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